Checking the Setup

A quick post outside of my usual posting schedule.

I was rewriting a T-SQL sproc I have that runs nightly to restore a database from one server to another. It had been failing for reasons beyond the scope of this article. But one of the issues we had was, we didn’t know it was failing. The error-checking was not as good as I would have liked. I decided to add a step that would email me on an error.

That’s easy enough to do. In this case I wanted to be able to use the stored procedure sp_notify_operator. This is useful since I don’t have to worry about passing in an email address or changing it if I need to update things. I can update the operator. However, the various servers at this client had been installed over a several year period and I wasn’t sure that all of them had the same operator configured. And I was curious as to who the emails the operators went to on those machines.  Now, I had a decent number of machines I wanted to check.

Fortunately, due to previous work (and you can read more here) I have a JSON file on my box so I can quickly loop through a list of servers (or if need be by servers in a particular environment like DEV or QA).

$serverobjlist = Get-Content -Raw -Path “$env:HomeDrive$env:HomePath\documents\WindowsPowerShell\Scripts\SQLServerObjectlist.json” | ConvertFrom-Json
 
foreach ($computername in $serverobjlist.computername)
{
$results = Invoke-Sqlcmd -ServerInstance $computername -query “select name, email_address from msdb.dbo.sysoperators”
write-host $computername $results.name $results.email_address
$results = Invoke-Sqlcmd -ServerInstance $computername -query “select name from msdb.dbo.sysmail_profile”
write-host $computername $results.name `n
}

This gave me a list of what operators were on what servers and who the emails went to. Now if this were a production script I’d probably have made things neater, but this worked well enough to do what I needed. Sure enough, one of the servers (ironically one of the ones more recently installed) was missing the standard mail Profile we setup. That was easy to fix because of course I have that scripted out. Open the T-Sql script on that server, run it, and all my servers now had the standard mail profile.

Once I had confirmed my new restore script could run on any of the servers and correctly send email if there was an error it was time to roll it out.

deploy

Successful deploy to the UAT environment

So one quick PowerShell Script, an updated T-SQL Script and a PowerShell Deploy Script and my new sproc has been deployed to UAT and other environments.

And best of all, because it was logged, I knew exactly when I had done it and on what servers and that everything was consistent.

I call that a win for a Monday. How is your week starting?

 

 

1 thought on “Checking the Setup

  1. Pingback: Quiet Time and Errors | greenmountainsoftware

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