Starting off the New Year… wrong

Ok, I had plans for a great blog post on time and how we measure it and how it really is arbitrary. But… that will have to wait. (I suppose that brings its own irony about time and waiting and all that. Hmm, now I may need a post about that!)

But, circumstances suggested a different post.

This one started with an email from my boss last year (who will remain nameless for his sake. 🙂  “Greg, I hacked together this web page so my team-members can track their hours. I need you to make a few tweaks to it. And don’t worry, we’ll replace it by the end of the year.”  Yes, that sound you hear is your head hitting the desk like mine, because you KNOW what is coming next. Here we are in January of 2018 and guess what, the web page is still in place.

And of course, it’s not just HIS (now former, he’s moved on) team that is using it. Apparently his boss liked what it could do, so his boss (my boss^2) declared that ALL his teams would use it.  So instead of just 4-5 people using it, there’s close to 30-40 people using it.

So, remember the first rule of development, “Oh don’t worry about this, we’ll replace it soon” never happens.  His original code made a lot of assumptions (which at the time I suppose seemed reasonable). For example, since many schedules are formed around work-weeks, he was originally storing hours by the week (and then day of the week) they were worked in. For example, if someone worked for 6 hours on January 5th of last year, the table stored that as “WEEK 1, day 5”.

Now, before anyone completely thinks this is nuts, do keep in mind, many places, including my last job at GE did everything by Week of the Year.  There’s some advantages to this (that I won’t go into here).

For the most part, the code worked and I didn’t care. But, at one point I was asked to do a report based not on Work Weeks, but on an actual calendar month. So, I had to figure out for example that February 1st occurred during Work Week 5, on the 4th day. And go from there.

So, I hacked that together.  Then where was a request for another report and another. Pretty soon it was getting to be a pain to keep track of all this. And I realized another problem. My boss had gotten lucky in 2017. January 1st occurred on a Sunday, which meant that Work Week 1, Day 1 was a natural starting point.

I started to worry about what would happen when 2018 rolled around. His code would probably break.  So I finally took the plunge and started to refactor the code.  I also added new features as they were requested.  Things were going great.

Until yesterday.  So now we get to another good rule of development: “Use Version Control” So simple. Even for a one person shop like me it’s a good idea. I had put it off for awhile, but finally downloaded the git plug-in for Visual Studio and started to use it.

So yesterday, a user reported that they couldn’t enter hours for last week. I pulled up the app and realized that yes, in fact it was coded in such a way you couldn’t go back into a previous year to enter hours. No problem, I can fix that!

Well, let me add a rule I had sort of missed; “Understand HOW to use Version Control”. I won’t go into details, but let’s just say, I wasn’t committing like I should have been or thought I was. So, in an attempt to get a clean base and all, I merged things… “poorly“. I had the branches I wanted, but had not properly committed stuff to them.

The work of the last few weeks was GONE. I know, you’re saying, “just go to your backups Greg, because of course a person who writes about DR has proper backups, right?”  Yeah, right! Let’s not go there!

Anyway, I spent 4 hours last night and 2 this morning recreating the code. Fortunately, it dawned on me, being .NET code, it was really just CLR and that perhaps with a good decompiler, I could get most of the code back without too much effort. I want to give props to RedGate’s .NET Reflector. Of the two decompilers I tried, it was clearly the better one. While I lost my variable names and the decompiled code isn’t quite what I’d call human written, it was close enough I could in short order recreate hours and hours of work I had done.

In the meantime, I also talked to some of my programming buddies on an RPI chat server (ask me about it sometime) about git and better procedures.

And here’s where I realized my fundamental mistake. It wasn’t just misunderstanding how Visual Studio was interacting with git and the branches I was creating, it was that somewhere in the back of my head I had decided that commits should be used only when major steps were completed. It was almost like I was afraid I’d run out; or perhaps complicate the history with too many of them.  But, you know what? Commits aren’t scarce resources. And I’m the only one reading the history. I don’t really care if I’ve got 10 commits or 100. The more the better in many ways. Had I been making commits much more frequently, I’d have saved myself a lot of work. (And I can discuss having a remote store at some point, etc.)

So really, the point of this hastily, sleep-deprived written blog isn’t so much to talk about dates and apps that never get replaced, but about a much deeper problem I was having. It wasn’t just failing to fully understand git commands, it was failing to understand how I should be using git in the first place.

So, to riff on an old phrase, “Commit Early, Commit often”.

Oh and I did hack together a way for that user to enter hours for last year. It’s good enough. I’m sure I won’t need it a year from now. The code will be all replaced or refactored by then I’m sure!

 

2 thoughts on “Starting off the New Year… wrong

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