White (K)nights

I apologize for skipping two weeks of blog posts, but I was a bit busy; for about 11 days my family and I were visiting Europe for the first time. It was a wonderful trip. It started with a trip to Manchester UK for a SQL Saturday event.

I had sort of forgotten exactly how much further north we were until it dawned on me how early dawn was.  Actually we had noticed the night before as we walked back from the amazingly wonderful speakers’ dinner how light it was despite how late it was.  When I woke up at around 4:30 AM (a bit of jetlag there) I noticed despite the blackout curtains how bright it was around their edges. I later looked it up, and it appears that technically it never reached “night” there, but simply astronomical twilight.

Ever since seeing the movie “White Nights” my wife has always wanted to experience the white nights of Russia. This wasn’t that, but it was close.

This trip followed up on the heels of the amazingly successful Thai Cave Rescue that I had previously commented on. As long term readers know, I’m a caver who also teaches cave rescue and has a role as the Northeast Coordinator of the National Cave Rescue Commission. During the 18 day saga, I and others were called upon by various media outlets to give our insight and perspective. I was fortunate, I only did a little under a dozen media events. Our National Coordinator, Anmar Mirza did well over 100, and most of those in about a 5 day period. A link to one of my media events is here: The Takeaway.

I don’t want to talk about the operation itself, but I want to talk about White Knights. We love our White Knights: the term often refers to a character who will ride into town and single-handedly solve the town’s problems. The truth is, white knights rarely if ever exist and that most problems require a lot more effort to solve.

We’ve seen this in politics, and we saw this with this cave rescue. Let me start by saying I think the work Elon Musk has done with SpaceX is amazing. SpaceX has in fact single-handedly revolutionized the space launch market.

It was perhaps inevitable that Musk’s name would show up in relation to this cave rescue. Musk has previously gotten attention for attempting to help with the power outage crisis in Puerto Rico and now his vow to help the people of Flint (both by the way I think worthy causes and I wish him and more importantly the people he’s trying to help, well).

But here’s the thing, a cave rescue isn’t solved by a white knight. It’s solved by a lot of effort and planning with a lot of people with a variety of skills and experience. There’s rarely a magic breakthrough that magically makes things easier.

And I’ll be blunt: his “submarine” idea, while interesting, was at best a PR distraction and at worst, possibly caused problems.

“But Greg, he was trying to help, how could this make things worse?”  I actually disengaged from an online debate with some Musk fanbois who couldn’t see why Musk’s offer was problematic. To them, he was the white knight that could never do wrong.

Here’s the thing: I know for a fact that several of us, myself included, had to take part of our allotted airtime or written coverage to address why Musk’s idea probably wouldn’t work. This meant less time or room for useful information to be passed on to the audience. Part of my role as regional coordinator is to educate people about cave rescue, and I can’t do this effectively when I’m asked to discuss distractions.

“But so what, that didn’t impact the rescue.” No, it didn’t. But, it appears from the Twitter fights I’ve seen, and other information, that at least some resources on the ground were tasked to deal with Musk. This does mean that people had to spend time dealing with both Musk and the publicity. This means those resources couldn’t be spent elsewhere. At least one report from Musk (which honestly I question) suggests he actually entered the cave during the rescue operations. This means that resources had to be spent on assuring his safety and possibly prevented another person who could have provided help in other ways (even if it was simply acting as a sherpa) from entering.

And apparently, there’s now a useless “submarine” sitting outside the cave.  I’ll leave discussion of why I had problems with the submarine itself for another post.

But here’s one final reason I have problem with Musk bringing so much attention to himself and his idea: It could have lead to second guessing.

Let’s be clear: even the cave divers themselves felt that they would most likely lose some of the kids; this was exactly how dangerous the rescue was. This is coming from the folks who best knew the cave and best understand the risks and issues.  Some of the best cave divers in the world, with rescue experience, who were on-site, thought that some kids would die in the attempt to rescue them. And, if reports are true, they were aware of Musk’s offer and obviously rejected it (and in fact one suggested later that Musk do something anatomically impossible with it.)

Had the rescuers worst fears come true, Musk fan bois would have second guessed every decision. In other words, people would have put more faith in their favorite white knight, who had zero practical experience in the ongoing operations , than they would have in the very people who were there and actively involved. I saw the comments before and during the operations from his fans and all of them were upset that their favorite white knight wasn’t being called in to save the day. I can only imagine how bad it would have been had something tragic occurred.

This is why I’m against white knights. They rarely if ever solve the problem, and worse when they do ride into town, they take time and energy away from those who are actually working on the problems. Leave the white knights on a chess board.

2 thoughts on “White (K)nights

  1. My issue with the offered assistance was the implication that rescuers were lacking in skills or resources in a way that needed an answer from off the board. Hospitals can always use contributions but heart surgeons NEVER need lay people will genius solutions to burst into the operating theater mid procedure. This was exactly Musk’s action, and exactly the position the extraordinarily skilled rescuers were in. Compounded by the fact that any awareness of the conditions at the scene made it clear the suggestion was non functional.

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