Marshmallows Part II

I’ll have to admit, I can rarely tell in advance when one of my posts will hit all the buttons and generate views and when it’ll fall flat. But as I don’t always write for my audience, sometimes I write for my own reasons, I can live with that.

So, how to follow-up on a post that didn’t receive many views, write a follow-up post. You can call me a slow learner.

Actually, it’s about learning. Last time I wrote about my microwave and doing a quick experiment with marshmallows to prove it was really dead.  After 2 days without a microwave it was time to get a new one. Of course I couldn’t get what I wanted because the space it had to fit into was limited in size.  That could have been resolved, but would have meant redoing the cabinet space it had to fit into. And if I were going to redo the cabinet space there, I might as well redo the rest of the cabinets. And if I’m going to redo the cabinets, I really need to redo the counters. And very quickly a replacement $100 microwave I can get in an hour would become a 3-week $10,000 kitchen remodel. I opted for the $100 microwave over the one I really wanted.

And the results are shown at the top of post (and below in case the top doesn’t appear)

melted marshmallow picture

10 seconds of marshmallows in the microwave

It’s quite interesting to me. The best heating was beyond the area of the rotating plate.  But this also shows the value of the rotating plate since if there’s a few sports, if I put a something to heat and everything was stationary, it would take forever to heat since there’s little to no microwave energy there. (This can get complex because of the size of the wave and the height of the material, etc.)

Now, I’d have done more experiments, but it seems a certain someone in the house enjoys marshmallows more than I do and had eaten a bunch and this was all I had.

But, I have a working microwave and I’ve proven how important the rotating plate can be (not that I had much doubt).

And that’s science to me; doing experiments and learning.

Oh and about the SQL query I was updating. It’s going into production this week hopefully. I was about to eek out about a 10-20% improvement. Beyond that, not much I could do because it really ends up scanning an entire table, on purpose.  Only so much you can do there.

One last thing: there may not be a post next week because I’ll be teaching at the NCRC weeklong cave training class in Indiana and will have limited internet and time.

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