Too Secure

There’s an old joke in IT that the Security Office’s job isn’t done until you can’t do yours.

There’s unfortunately at times some truth to that.  And it can be a bigger problem than you might initially think.

A recent example comes to mind. I have one client that has setup fairly strict security precautions. I’m generally in favor of most of them, even if at times they’re inconvenient. But recently, they made some changes that were, frustrating to say the least and potentially problematic.  Let me explain.

Basically, at times I have to transfer a file created on a secured VM I control to one of their servers (that in theory is a sandbox in their environment that I can play in). Now, I obviously can’t just cut and paste it. Or perhaps that’s not so obvious, but yeah, for various reasons, through their VDI, they have C&P disabled. I’m ok with that. It does lessen the chance of someone accidentally cutting and pasting the wrong file to the wrong machine.

So what I previously did was something that seemed strange, but worked. I’d email the file to myself and then open a browser session on the said machine and get the file there. Not ideal and I’ll admit there are security implications, but it does cause the file to get virus scanned at at least two places and I’m very unlikely to send myself a dangerous file.

Now, for my webclient on this machine, I tended to use Firefox. It was kept up to date and as far as I know, up until recently, on their approved list of programs.  Great. This worked for well over a year.

Then, one day last week, I go to the server in question and there’s no Firefox. I realized this was related to an email I had seen earlier in the week about their security team removing Firefox from a different server, “for security reasons”. Now arguably that server didn’t need Firefox, but still, my server was technically MY sandbox. So, I was stuck with IE. Yes, their security team thinks IE is more secure than Firefox.  Ok, no problem I’ll use IE.

I go ahead, enter my userid and supersecret password. Nothing happens. Try a few times since maybe I got the password wrong. Nope. Nothing.  So I tried something different to confirm my theory and get the dreaded, “Your browser does not support cookies” error. Aha, now I’m on to something.

I jump into the settings and try several different things to enable cookies completely. I figure I can return things to the way they want after I get my file. No joy. Despite enabling every applicable options, it wouldn’t override the domain settings and cookies remained disabled.  ARGH.

So, next I figured I’d re-download FF and use that. It’s my box after all (in theory).

I get the install downloaded, click on it and it starts to install. Great! What was supposed to be a 5 minute problem of getting the file I needed to the server is about done. It’s only taken me an hour or two, but I can smell success.

Well, turns out what I was smelling was more frustration. Half-way through the install it locks up. I kill the process and go back to the file I downloaded and try again. BUT, the file isn’t there. I realize after some digging that their security software is automatically deleting certain downloads, such as the Firefox install.

So I’m back to dead in the water.

I know, I’ll try to use Dropbox or OneDrive. But… both require cookies to get setup.  So much for that.

I’ve now spend close to 3 hours trying to get this file to their server.  I was at a loss as to how to solve this. So I did what I often do in situations like this. I jumped in the shower to think.

Now, I finally DID manage to find a way, but I’m actually not going to mention it here. The how isn’t important (though keeping the details private are probably at least a bit important.)

Anyway, here’s the thing. I agree with trying to make servers secure. We in IT have too many data breaches as it is. BUT, there is definitely a problem with making things TOO secure. Actually two problems. The first is the old joke about how a computer encased in cement at the bottom of the ocean is extremely secure. But also unusable.  So, their security measures almost got us to the state of making an extremely secure  but useless computer.

But the other problem is more subtle. If you make things too secure, your users are going to do what they can to bypass your security in order to get their job done. They’re not trying to be malicious, but they may end up making things MORE risky by enabling services that shouldn’t be installed or by installing software you didn’t authorize, thus leaving you in an unknown security state (for the record, I didn’t do either of the above.)

Also, I find it frustrating when steps like the above are taken, but some of the servers in their environment don’t have the latest service packs or security fixes. So, they’re fixing surface issues, but ignoring deeper problems. While I was “nice” in what I did; i.e. I technically didn’t violate any of their security measures in the end, I did work to bypass them. A true hacker most likely isn’t going to be nice. They’re going to go for the gold and go through one of at least a dozen unpatched security holes to gain control of the system in question. So as much as I can live with their security precautions of locking down certain software, I’d also like to see them actually patch the machines.

So, security is important, but let’s not make it so tight people go to extremes to by pass it.

 

2 thoughts on “Too Secure

  1. Pingback: Too Secure 2 | greenmountainsoftware

  2. Pingback: This is secure, right? | greenmountainsoftware

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

w

Connecting to %s