Security: Close isn’t good enough!

I was going to write about something else and just happened to see a tweet from Grant Fritchey that prompted a change in topics.

I’ve written in the past about good and bad password and security polices. And yes, often bad security can be worse than no security, but generally no security is the worst option of all.

Grant’s comment reminded me of two incidents I’ve been involved with over the years that didn’t end well for others.

In the first case, during the first dot-com bubble, I was asked to partake in the due diligence of a company we were looking to acquire. I expected to spend a lot of time on the project, but literally spent about 30 minutes before I sent an email saying it wasn’t worth going further.

Like all dot-com companies, they had a website. That is after all, sort of a requirement to be a dot-com. And it was obvious it was backed by a database server (which I knew was SQL Server, which sped up my process, but only by a few minutes). So, I did the obvious thing and got the IP address of the web-site. Then, I simply tried to connect to SQL Server from my desktop to that IP address and one or two on either side of it. On my second attempt, the IP address right before the one of the website replied to my attempt to reach SQL Server. That was not a good sign. The reply meant there was no effective firewall in place. Note, had they not been using SQL Server, but some other tech, it might have taken me another 10-15 minutes to find the right client to connect. So knowing it was SQL Server wasn’t overly important.

But of course at least they had a password right? Well, back then, the latest and greatest version of SQL Server was 2000 which still did not require a password when you set it up.  I asked myself, “it couldn’t be that easy could it?”

Sure enough it was. Within minutes I had logged in as sa without a password. I now had complete control of their SQL Server. But even more so, back then SQL Server allowed unfettered access to xp_cmdshell. In theory at that point I could have done anything I wanted on the box, including installing remote access software and creating and giving myself administrator access.  I didn’t. But, my email to my boss was short and sweet. I explained how there was absolutely no way we could acquire their platform without a complete top to bottom review of it for any signs of malware. If it took me only 30 minutes or less to get in, I was almost certain their system was owned.

We never acquired that company. I’ve wondered since then what happened to them. My guess is, like many dot-com companies they folded. I can’t say it would have been because of their lack of security, but I can say that the lack of security played a huge factor in us NOT acquiring them. (and for the record, the company I worked for at the time ended up acquiring 1-2 other companies, merging with a 3rd and finally being acquired by a 4th, which is still around. So we were doing something mostly right.)

The second incident that comes to mind was about 8 years later at another start-up. I was asked by the COO to do some due diligence on the setup in another division’s datacenter setup. Again, I didn’t do anything fancy. I knew they weren’t running SQL Server, but I figured I could still do some probing. This time what I found was a bit different. It wasn’t software per se, but rather their iSCSI switch. Sure enough not only did it have a public facing IP address, but, the CTO of that division had failed to change the default password. I was very tempted at the time to give the IP address to my 8 year old son, without any other details and asking him to try to log in. Given his skills, even at that age, I’m 99% sure he’d have figured how to Google the required information and get in. But I figured I didn’t really need to do that to make my point.

That and other factors later lead to the CTO leaving the company.

Moral of the story: Make sure your sensitive information is under some form of lock and key and don’t use blank or factory default passwords, let you or your company end up in a headline like this one: Evisort Data Exposed.

2 thoughts on “Security: Close isn’t good enough!

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