Free Cell #1703491

This is a completely random post and for a very select crowd.

I often play Freecell (far to much, but that’s another story). Years ago, when it first came out with Windows XP, I wondered if every game was winnable. Apparently, not. That said, I haven’t come across any of the “impossible games”. But I’ve come across a few hard ones.

But none nearly as hard as game #1703491. Usually I can solve most games in 2-5 minutes, sometimes it takes 15-30. I was into this one for over 2 hours before I did something I’ve rarely done. I looked for help. Mostly I wanted to know I wasn’t playing an impossible game. A brief search suggested I wasn’t. A longer search proved I wasn’t. But there was only one cryptic suggestion. I had pretty much settled on this being the most likely path, clearing the 6th column.

Now, small sidebar. To add a bit of a challenge, I have a self-imposed rule that I don’t put cards up on the home cells manually, I let the game move them automatically. In other words, if there’s a free card I can put up there manually, but that won’t go automatically, I won’t put it up. This happens for example if the the home cells AH, blank, 2D, AS, I won’t put up the 3 of diamonds. The game won’t automatically put up the 3D until the 2H, 2C and 2S are up there also. Like I say, no real reason other than the extra challenge. I had to break that rule in this game.

Anyway, even with that advice, I kept getting stuck.

A common spot I would get to was:

Making Progress

Still not much wiggle room

This was the first time I had freed up the 8th column. So that was progress and I had considered that key. I’m not sure what took me this long to figure out this combination of moves.

And now the break-thru. I’m feeling good here. I know once I get the 2 of Hearts up there, I’ll be making real progress!

This move is obvious

Now I’m gaining momentum. I may seem tempting to free up that 2 of Spades. Resist that temptation!

Don’t play the obvious move!

Rather you want to move that stack on the 5 of Hearts. With that move and a few others you end up at:

Now we’re making real progress!

The next few moves are pretty clear. Now we can move up that 2 of Spaces and after that the game is clearly winnable.

Getting Close

That said, I have to break my own rule one more time, but I don’t care. I’m ready to win.

Almost There!

And that’s it! I can relax now!

This Post is Free!

Yes, seriously, other than a bit of your time, it will cost you nothing to read this post. And you might gain something from it. That can be a good value.

As I’ve mentioned in the past, one of things I do when I’m not doing SQL Server is perform training for those interested in Cave Rescue. I also sometimes blog about it. I have also mentioned that this year I’m organizing the National Cave Rescue Commission‘s national weeklong training class. In addition, since apparently I’m not enough of a masochist I’m also organizing a regional Level 1 only weeklong training class.

Due to generous contributions the NCRC is able to offer scholarships. For the regional weeklong, we are able to offer 4 scholarships of a value of up to $375 each. This covers 1/2 the cost of training. Applications were due Saturday. Now, we’re hoping for 12-20 students, so this means if everyone applied, they’d have between a 1/3-1/5 chance of getting scholarship. Can you guess how many had applied as of Saturday?

Before I answer that, I’ll note my wife used to work as a financial aid director at a local nursing school. They too sometimes offered scholarships. There was one worth I believe $500 that often went unclaimed. Yes, it required a one page essay to be judged to apply. That one page apparently was too high of a barrier for many folks and as a result sometimes it was never awarded. Quite literally a person could have written. “I would like to apply for the scholarship” as their essay and gotten it.

The same thing happened with our regional scholarships. Out of 11 students so far, none applied. This was literally free money sitting on the table. We have decided to extend the scholarship application process until April 23rd and reminded folks they could apply.

Now, some of the students probably can NOT apply, because they are employees of government agencies that sometimes have rules on what outside funds or gifts can be accepted. This actually increases the odds for the other students. And some may feel that their economic status is good enough that they don’t need to and fear they’d take a scholarship away from someone who has more of a need for it. And that’s a position I can definitely appreciate. But my advice to them, “let the scholarship committee make that decision.” If they determine someone is more needing the money, or your need is not enough, they will let you know. And if they do give you a scholarship and you feel guilty, pay it forward. Donate to the fund later on, or give the money you saved to other causes.

Besides essentially free money at the NCRC, I got thinking about the amount of free training I’ve received in the SQL Server community. Yes, I’ve paid for PASS Summit a few times, but even if I had never gone to that, the amount of knowledge I’ve gained for free over the past several years has been amazing. Between SQL Saturdays and User Group meetings, the body of knowledge I’ve been exposed to has been absolutely amazing.

And yet, I know folks who shun such activities. I’m not talking about folks who say, “I can’t make it this month because it’s my kid’s birthday”. I’m talking about folks who claim they never learn anything. I don’t understand how that’s possible given the HUGE range of topics I’ve seen at SQL Saturdays and oh so many other free events. Some folks seem to think only the paid events are worth it. And while PASS Summit had certain unique advantages, the truth is, you can listen to almost all the presenters at various free events too.

Yes, time is not free, and I recognize that. But overall, it still amazes me at the number of folks who overlook the value of free events, or easy to gain scholarships to events. Don’t turn your nose up at free. It can be valuable.

P.S. – for the parents of college bound kids out there, one thing I did in college which netted me a bit of free money. A few days after the semester began, I’d stop by the financial aid office and ask if there was any unclaimed scholarship money I was eligible for. I never netted much, but I did net a few hundred dollars over the years. For 15 minutes of my time, that’s a pretty decent ROI.

Make Security Easy

This will be a short blog this week, but I want to talk again about an issue I have with a client of mine. They make security hard.

This is not to say they don’t take it seriously, or that they are lax. Far from it. They actually are fairly stringent on their security protocols and get after folks on ensuring boxes are consistently patched and that passwords are stringent and details like that. Overall I’d give them probably an B on security. But I can’t quite give them an A.

There’s really two reasons for that:

The first is inconsistency. Let me be clear, getting to their internal network is appropriately difficult. I have to use their secure VPN, with soft-tokens and similar measures. Technically before I can access a box, I have to jump through multiple hurdles. I’m ok with that. What’s a pain is on some boxes if I walk away for an extended period of time, the screen remains unlocked and nothing changes. Now, because of my OWN security model my computer will lock FAR sooner than that. And my default mode is to typically lock my own computer anytime I walk away from it (and that’s within my own house). But for some machines, if there’s no keyboard or mouse input, the screen will lock after 15 minutes, but my session won’t ever be logged out. For others, the screen will lock after 15 minutes and my session will be logged out after several hours. There appears to be no real rhyme no reason to this other than a slight correlation with when the box was configured.

Now, in general, I think locking unattended screens can be a good thing. The downside is, due to the nature of my job, I may start work on one machine, flip over to another to do something like update the schema and then flip back to the first, only to find my screen locked. In some cases, I won’t. It’s inconsistent. Ideally I think it should be consistent.

So, if you have a security protocol, decide on what it is, and make it consistent.

But the real complaint I have, and this has been true of multiple companies I’ve worked with: make security easy.

Again, with this particular client, on most, but not all boxes, I can easily download and install the required patches. (OS level patches are handled by their internal IT team which is a huge win). But some machines have firewall rules in place such that you can’t download the patch directly to the machine. You have to go to a jump box, download the patch there and copy it over. This is fairly inconvenient. Now, if this were consistent across all machines I’d develop procedures around that, but they’re not consistent. This is particularly a problem for software that often will actually only download a stub installer that will then try to download the actual patch. In this case, if you simply copy over the stub and try to run it to patch the machine, it too will fail. This means you need to find the often hard to find link to download the full patch to the jump box and then copy that over. In some cases, it’s even worse, you have to manually place files where you want them. I had this occur on an update I was doing to a module for PowerShell. I had to download the installer to a jump box, extract what I needed and manually copy the files to the right subdirectory. Now, granted, I get paid by the hour, but I’d like to think my clients pay me for things other than copying files.

I’ve seen another related issue at other clients when it came to patching. They’d patch users desktops during the day and default to “reboot in the next 10 minutes” with no option of delaying the patch or reboot. Now, there are possibly first day exploits where this might be warranted, but this was the default for ALL Windows patches. This was really discouraging to employees and multiple times caused them to lose work, especially it they were away from the desk during this time and didn’t have a chance to save their work. The sad part is that there are multiple ways this could have easily been handled that would have had far less impact on the employees.

In the end, security is critical, but we should be making it as easy to comply as possible and as consistent as possible. There’s an old adage that the security person doesn’t stop doing their job until they’ve stopped you from doing yours. Don’t make that a truism.