“So, why are you sitting here?”

I had been anticipating the question and it was a fair question, after all, I was one of two men sitting at the Women in Technology Birds of a Feather table at PASS Summit.  But let me back up a bit.

Last week was the PASS Summit in Seattle, an annual event that I mentioned two weeks ago that I was headed to. There are several thousand people that attend and in order to promote networking, in the massive lunch hall, they have a number of tables set aside for particular topics, i.e. “birds of a feather”. So if there’s a particular topic or interest group you are associated with you, you can sit at such a table and know you’re among like minded friends. For example on Day One I had set at the “Virtual and Local User Group” table.  But today, I found myself at the Women in Technology table.

So why?

Let’s back up even further. I grew up in a small town in the northwest corner of Connecticut. I can’t say my parents were poor, but we probably lived below what many would consider a middle-class lifestyle. However, I was very fortunate to have hard-working parents and grandparents who helped, and more than a bit of privilege.  What do I mean by this? One example comes to mind. A couple of years after college when I was first consulting, I needed a small business loan to cover a project for a client. I literally walked into the local bank and on my word got the loan I needed. Even then I realized I had a bit of privilege going on there.

As I’ve grown older, I’ve listened to more and more testimonies from women and persons of color and continued to realize how for granted I’ve taken many aspects of my life. As a result, I’ve worked to listen to others and try to increase their access to opportunities and gain the same privilege I was simply born with by being a white male.

So why was I there?

The question was not a surprise, since the table host, Kathi Kellenberger had said she wanted to go around the table and ask folks why they were there. fortunately she hadn’t started with me first! This gave me time to think about my answer.

To listen. To listen to two women of color talk about their struggles and efforts to make it into the world of being SQL DBAs. To listen to other women talk about their experiences and to learn from them.

So I gave that and a bit more as my answer and then shut up and listened. It was a great lunch and a great experience.  As my friend, and WIT Virtual Group co-leader (along Kathi) Rie Irish is wont to say, “if women could solve these problems we’d have done so by now. We need your help”.

So to my fellow men out there, I would say, be an ally. Attend the WIT Luncheon (which was the day before) at Pass Summit.  Encourage women to speak at your User Group and at SQL Saturdays, stop others from interrupting them during meetings, amplify their ideas. And sometimes, just shut up and listen. And if you’re involved with SQL Server and PASS and want more information reach out to Rie and Kathi and contact the Virtual Group the manage, Women in Technology.  Trust me, men are welcome as allies.

 

SQL Pass 2018

Next week I’m off to the SQL Pass conference in Seattle.  This will be my 4th peregrination to Seattle in 4 years. This has become an annual trip for me. There’s one very obvious reason for going and then a 2nd also important reason.  SQL Pass is one of the top events for folks who work with SQL Server. It’s a 3 day conference (plus up to 2 days of pre-con events, including at least one meeting I’ll be attending as our local group leader) full of technical sessions covering a wide range of topics related to SQL Server and related technologies.

Four years ago, when I first attended, I was a newbie and wasn’t sure what to expect. My father had recently passed and I wasn’t entirely sure I still wanted to make the trip. But tickets had been bought and the price to attend been paid, so I decided to go. One of the first (perhaps the first) session I attended, was a session by Kathi Kellenberger on how to get published as an author. I had for years toyed with an idea for a book and I figured it couldn’t hurt to attend and perhaps learn something. Her session was quite helpful and I approached her afterwards for more input and she introduced me to one of the editors at Apress. I pitched my idea and a few months later, the contracts were signed.  All I had to do now was actually write the thing.  So, I ended up writing IT Disaster Response: Lessons Learned in the Field. (btw, I do obviously recommend it, it covers IT disasters, plane crashes and cave rescues. It’s not your standard cut and dry boring book on disasters.)

A friend of mine who owns a book shop once said, “anyone can write a book, it’s harder actually publish a book.” I had now done both. It was a bit bittersweet because my dad had been an English major and had always wanted to write a book and be published. Now, admittedly, he wanted to write fiction, which I think is far harder, and in his day, the idea of “print on demand” like what Apress tends to do, didn’t really exist.  And to be honest, at the end of the day, as Kathi warned me, if I was in it for the money, I’d be better off in terms of hours spent, getting a job at McDonald’s.

But, I digress. That book ended up being my first foray into actually getting paid to write.  As I mentioned in an earlier blog post I’ve now contributed to Red Gate’s Simple Talk program with my post on an Intro to PowerShell. And my second post has been submitted and accepted and hopefully is going up in a few weeks or so.

So, to say my first PASS event changed my live would probably be accurate.

Beyond that one session four years ago, I’ve attended many other sessions and learned a wealth of knowledge and leveraged that in my job and in finding speakers for my local SQL Server User Group which I now lead. One of my favorite speakers I had in the last year was Bob Ward who did a remote presentation for us about SQL Server on Linux. And this despite me being a Patriots fan and him being a *cough* Cowboys fan.

So again, I look forward to seeing a lot of my #sqlfamily out in Seattle next week. But I still won’t be doing karaoke, sorry Aunt Kathi!

But I also mentioned a second reason for visiting: my non-sqlfamily, what I might call my #rocfamily.  The Rensselaer Outing Club has a number of alumns who all live in the area and we’ve started a yearly tradition of getting together for take-out Thai food at the house I stay in. ROC in its own way changed my life, among other things, teaching me how to be a leader and an effective decision maker.

In addition to all my fellow ROCcers, there’s at least one from my days on sci.space.* on Usenet (where I can still be found btw) and a few other friends I’ve made over the years. I’m quite looking forward to seeing them all.

So see you all next week in Seattle!

And so it Happened…

New Faces

Last year I made a decision to try to do at least one SQL Saturday outside my “normal” geographic region; which basically encompasses down to Washington DC and out to Rochester NY and Boston. I’ve spoken at a number of SQL Saturdays in this area. I’ve enjoyed all of them. And generally I’ve drawn a decent audience, with a few exceptions.

But, one of the problems of doing that is you keep seeing the same speakers over and over. And while we’ve got a great crowd of speakers, I wanted to hear from speakers I might not normally hear from. Also, unless you’re constantly creating new content (which you should for a multitude of reasons), after awhile your possible audience has heard everything you have to say.

So last year, I put a bid in for SQL Saturday Chicago and was very pleased to be accepted. I had a great time staying with some friends in the area and also a great time at the Speakers Dinner and After Party as well as at the event itself. I met a number of speakers I had not met before and heard a few speaker that I had not previously heard. And, I had a fresh new audience who seemed to really enjoy my topic on “Tips that have saved my Bacon.”

Colorado Springs

So this year, I had a choice of places to put in bids for. I selected Colorado Springs and was pleasantly surprised to find they’d accepted me.  Since I’ve got a friend in the area, that cut down on costs considerably.  It was a win win.

I had a great time at the Speakers Dinner on Friday night and met more speakers that I had not previous met. A quick shout out to @toddkleinhans and Cyndi Johnson and @DBAKevlar among others. It was great. We talked a bit about using VR to navigate a query, about reprogramming our brains and more.

I was excited for the next day. Sure, it was last session of the day, but I showed up early so I could hang out in the Speakers’ Lounge, see some of the other sessions, and hang with my friends, the MidnightDBAs, Sean and Jenn McCown.

Then it happened

As a speaker you have a lot of fears; the slide deck crashing, your computer applying updates in the middle of your talk (it happens!) and more. But I think the one that perhaps you don’t necessarily dread the most, but you’re most disappointed by, is when…. no one shows up! Catherine Wilhelmsen has a great blog post about this and I have to agree with pretty much everything she says.

All I can say is… “it happens”. I know it’s happened to other speakers, many who I have a great deal of respect for and think are a tier above me in terms of their talks.

Sometimes it’s just luck of the draw. Sometimes, as I suspect played a role here, it’s the end of the day, a number of folks have gone home already and ALL the sessions have lower numbers than ones earlier in the day. It could be the organizers misjudged the topics the audience wanted. It could be my title or description just didn’t entice folks (I suspect this is part of the issue with a different talk I gave, where I got too cutesy with the title. I’ve changed the title and updated the description and I’m scheduled to present it again at another SQL Saturday. So at least the organizers there think it’ll draw folks.)

But overall, yeah, it’s frustrating, but a single talk doesn’t make or break me as a speaker. It happens and we move on.

Conclusion

It was still worth coming out to SQL Saturday Colorado Springs and I don’t regret it. I’m grateful to the organizers that gave me the opportunity.  So thanks.

Oh and one more thing I noticed while going back through notes for this blog entry: SQL Saturday Chicago 2017 was event 600, Colorado Springs 2018 was 700. That’s 100 in a year, almost 2 a week. And I was asked to speak at (including Chicago) 6 of them I believe. That’s a pretty good percentage.

I’m content.

That said come see me next month at SQL Saturday Philadelphia! I’m not sure what time I’m scheduled for yet, but I’ll be speaking on “So you want to Present: Tips and Tricks of the Trade”. And yes, I will talk about when people don’t show up. That’s assuming I have an audience 🙂

 

 

SQL Saturday DC 2017 Follow-up

Last week I wrote about heading towards SQL Saturday DC. This week I figured I’d write a follow-up.

I want to start by saying thanks to everyone who organized and set things up and ran it. I’ve only been on the periphery of working the Albany SQL Saturday, but I have an inkling of what it takes to run an event like this. There’s so much work, much of it obvious, but also a myriad of small details, many that never get seen or noticed.

Since I like to talk about “thinking” in this blog I’m going to mention one such detail that I’m sure no one gave much though about, but was there. Chris Bell is one of the principal organizers of the DC event (but far from the only one who works it). I’m going to give away one of his secrets (and I hope he’s ok with that!)

So one of the decisions an event organizer has to decide is how long to make the sessions. Generally they run 60 minutes or 75 minutes. (Occasionally you might see some that run 90 minutes). 15 minutes may not seem like much, but over 4-5 sessions, it can mean the difference between adding or removing an entire session during the course of the day.

Now as a speaker, I can’t say I have a real preference. A 60 minute session often feels like I have to rush a bit, but a 75 minute session tends to mean I may have to add content, OR perhaps end a bit early, especially if there’s not a lot of questions at the end.

And that last detail is a critical detail that Chris took advantage of.

See, one of the logistical issues any major event has to worry about is feeding people. At a large event like PASS Summit, they have an entire and huge room just dedicated for lunch with rows and rows of serving tables. They can, if they had to, get everyone through the lunch line and served in a short period of time. However, at smaller events, with a smaller budget, especially 1 day events, it makes little sense to rent a space that large.

So, if you have limited space and limited time, how do you handle lunch, and especially trying to get your speakers and staff through first (so they can be prepared for their next session)?

You take advantage of the fact that every seminar before lunch isn’t necessarily going to use the full 75 minutes! You start lunch say, 15 minutes before the END of the pre-lunch sessions. Some sessions will end 15 minutes early, so those folks can get in line right away. 1-2 might end 10 minutes early and they can get in line after the previous folks are just finishing getting their lunches.  And so on.

So, you end up serving everyone in a reasonable amount of time, but you don’t have huge long lines all of a sudden. You have a much more reasonable distribution of people across your available time.

So, that’s something to think about when scheduling events. Oh by the way, if you’re doing massive maintenance or dataloads to your SQL Server database, you might want to see if you can spread out your I/O in a similar way. (Hmm, I had to get SOME SQL Server content in here, right?)

So, remember, if you think outside the box, sometimes you can get more done than otherwise!

P.S. I couldn’t finish this blog post without a huge shout-out to the @SQLSpouse and stealth Princess Gigi Bell and say thanks again for the card!

SQL Saturday DC 2017 Prologue

I’ll apologize upfront, not every blog post is mind-shattering and deep. This is one such lightweight one.

Once again I’ll be heading to a SQL Saturday, this time in Washington DC. I actually had two to choose from, one in Providence Rhode Island and this one. Mostly because I have friends in DC from the days I worked there, I choose to submit some sessions to present in DC.

Submitting presentations is always a bit nerve-wracking for me. You feel confident you’ve got a good session and you hope it is what what the organizers want. I’m not really sure how many SQL Saturdays I submitted sessions to before I was finally selected for my first one in NYC. My topic then (and still one I still present from time to time) was “Tips that Saved my Bacon.” I even made bacon cookies to hand out. (Never again, they didn’t come out great.) I knew I was off to a good start when I saw Micron Technologies handing out t-shirts with a bacon motif and even a scent of bacon. Must be kismet.

I get to my room, I get setup, I’m all set. I’m a bit excited and waited for the people to pour in and fill the room. Ok, then I waited for anyone to walk into the room. Finally some people showed up. Great, first hurdle cleared, I had an audience. Not as large as I had hoped with which to share my amazing wisdom, but an adequate one nonetheless.

Before I started, a question, from a woman I believe who was Muslim, “what is bacon?” Of course, with pork being harām to most observant Muslims, she may have never even encountered it. But I realized too, I had a bigger issue. She didn’t understand the idiom!  I was really off to a great start now.  I did the best to explain both what it was and the idiom.  She seemed satisfied. And then we were off.

Fortunately I sort of had a plant in the audience; a friend of mine who was attending who had wanted to hear my talk.  He claims he got a lot out of it.  I hope so.

Since then I’ve given that talk several times and fortunately had better turnouts and better results.

After that I’ve had pretty good luck in getting selected to speak, but sometimes you still get the rejection. I had previously put in to speak at DC at least twice before and turned down both time. You take it in stride and try to not take it personally.

So, again, this year I put in to speak at DC. I submitted three different possible presentations, hoping at least one would be accepted.

The final date for submissions came and went. And nothing. Then I saw they had reopened the period for submissions. This didn’t instill hope in me getting selected.

And still nothing. Oh well, I decided I’d go to SQL Saturday DC anyway, just to attend and to see my friends in DC.

Then I was at the RedGate After Party at Pass Summit and Chris Hyde walked up to me and said, “Congratulations. I really wanted to see your talk in DC, but apparently we’re presenting at the same time.” So, I had to go through my emails and find the one from DC. (That day I had a system that was giving me some warning messages, so I had to sort through about 100 messages to find the one from SQL Saturday DC, hence why I had originally missed it.)

But, as Chris didn’t say WHICH of my presentations he was going to miss, I pulled out my phone, logged into the site. And lo and behold, I discovered I wasn’t presenting just once, but TWICE! I was completely shocked. And… now in a wee bit of trouble.

You see my talk on Who’s flying the plane? What IT can learn from plane crashes, is one of my favorites and one I’ve given multiple times before (and the one apparently Chris will miss). But, my 2nd talk Presently Presenting…. Presenting was one that had hadn’t quite fully written. Ok, I had the outline in my head, but hadn’t written it at all! I generally do NOT recommend this style of doing things. I really like to present at a smaller group first (say my local user group) but I figured this was a good way to give me a kick in the pants and get the talk written. And I was right. The presentation is written, I’ve run through it a few times (and will run through it a few times more before Saturday) and I’m quite happy with it at this point.

So, this coming Saturday, I’ll be giving not just one, but two talks at SQL Saturday in DC. If you’re reading this and already signed up, I’d love to see you there. If we know each other, of course say hi. If we don’t, introduce yourself. I always enjoy meeting new folks.

And if you haven’t signed up, there is unfortunately a wait-list, but you can still add your name to it and if folks cancel, get in.

So, I hope to see you there!

P.S. I’ll give one piece of advice that’ll be in my talk on presenting. If you DO get turned down, don’t take it personally. Take it with grace. SQL Saturday organizers face a lot of challenges in picking presenters and are often overwhelmed with the number of submissions. Trying to argue with them or worse calling them names or getting upset with them is a sure fire way to guarantee you do NOT get selected in the future. And, organizers talk to each other. You do NOT want to get tagged with being “that person”. If you get turned down, don’t take it personally and move on.