JOBS THAT BEAT THE CARING OUT OF YOU

Let me start by saying this is NOT an April Fool’s Joke. This is a true story.

I do lay the ‘blame’ for this post squarely two members of my #SQLFamily: first on the heels of Grant Fritchey and his post by he same name. He in turn lays blame on Jen McCown’s post by the same name.

I mention elsewhere in my blog I prefer to be intelligiently lazy, so rather than retype, I’ll post the content from a Quora answer I wrote.  Technically I was just a consultant, and after twice getting a late check I made it clear to them that if they stopped paying me on time, I would stop working.  Apparently they liked me enough that a quick call to the CFO would get me a check cut that day.

So with that:

Let me give you an example of a client I once had. When I started with them, people loved working there and they were expanding and successful. So successful the company got bought.

Then… things changed.

Sales people were finding their expense checks weren’t getting paid (more on that later). Did you know, even if you try to explain to the credit card company that it’s a “company card” if it’s in your name and the company doesn’t pay it, you’ll ruin your credit score? Yes, it’s pretty difficult to be a sales person who can’t travel because no one will give you a credit card any more!

Then, to cut costs, an office move was proposed. Quite frankly, had I not been involved as their IT guy, it would have been a disaster for a variety of reasons. Fortunately for them, besides my IT skills, I could read blueprints. It was quite obvious to me that 2 outlets would not serve an office of 20–25 people with computers and printers. It took me nearly kidnapping the CFO on a day he visited and dragging him to the office to make clear how much more work the office needed. They simply assumed, “oh, it’ll have enough power.”

Meanwhile the previous owner had started a new company (in a completely different industry) and was growing and expanding at a furious rate. Also, my wife was a recruiter at another local company (in a different industry also). The only thing all three of these companies had in common was they all were software related, but the fields they served were completely different.

At one point, the top sales person from the failing company left to go get a job a with the new company. Within days the former company sent a cease and desist letter to the new company insisting they stop poaching employees and if they continued, they’d sue the owner for violating the non-compete clause. Now, keep in mind the owner was very much NOT approaching employees of the old company, but even if he were, the non-compete only applied if he had founded a new company in the same industry. he hadn’t. We had a good laugh at the old company.

Now, meanwhile, my wife, while not exactly poaching, knew that almost any offer she made would be accepted since morale was so bad at the old company.

Then… this happened. I was there for the meeting and sat in on it. It’s the closest I’ve come to “beatings will continue until morale improves” ever.

The CFO and CEO came into town for an all-hands meeting. Their goal was to address, among other things, the late employee expense checks issue.

I will say, they had some pretty looking slides. The slides showed things like cash-flow, moving towards profitability and some other items. But the message was quite clear, “We will continue to pay YOUR expense checks as late as possible because it helps our cash flow. And you should be grateful for this.” They very much could NOT understand why employees were furious that their expenses were basically being used as no-interest loans by the company. The rate of exits accelerated after that.

What had been a thriving company became a dying, decaying shell of a company in under a year because of the management.

One Postscript:

One of the developers who left the old company ended up at the new company. He submitted his expense check. He was reasonable, he knew it would probably hit his next pay cycle. He was OK with that. I still recall the look on his face when later that day someone from finance walked in with his expense check. They were under no obligation to turn it around that fast and he certainly wasn’t expecting it. But they did so. They “bought” his loyalty that day by a simple gesture.

So, if people are leaving, trying to force them to stay will backfire. Figure out what you’re doing wrong and fix it.

42

How many roads must a man walk down, before you call him a man? – Bob Dylan

There’s a trailhead to Whiteface Mountain in the Adirondacks that starts on an old forest road. It’s probably left over from the days of logging. I haven’t been on this trail in probably 20 or more years. It might be closer to 30. And yet, for some reason I can picture it in my mind almost perfectly. Or at least I think I can. I mean without going back, how can I be sure I accurately remember it? But the reality in my mind is that I recall it perfectly.

I also remember key points along the trail. Sometimes I will wander down this road in my memory and remember the joys of this particular hike. I should do it again someday.

There are many physical roads like that that I travel down in my mind and hope to go back to again someday.

But, at night, as I lay in bed, there are some roads in my mind I find I just can’t travel down anymore. Or at least not now, perhaps in the future. Last night as I was drifting off, I started to remember my father’s property in the years soon after he bought it. It had a number of outbuildings that had been built over the years. I’m still not sure what they were used for, since it was a never a working farm or anything like that, and even so they weren’t the sort of buildings one would use for such a purpose. I do recall one had some old nudes pasted on the wall.  I remember having grandiose plans for turning one into sort of a clubhouse for me and my friends, but for various reasons… life happened and that didn’t.

Travelling down this particular road started to bring up other memories of my father, who would have been 72 this year. And I stare down these lanes of memory and have to stop myself. Some I know I can explore and laugh and smile as I travel down the fond memories, others… well I have built gates across them. The memories are too close and too raw and I fear if I travel down them any distance I’ll get lost in those memories and the pain will be too much. So, I look over the gate and say, “not now…”

Gradually I’ve found some of those gates I can open, but not all.

The Road goes ever on and on,
Down from the door where it began.
Now far ahead the Road has gone,
And I must follow, if I can,
Pursuing it with eager feet,
Until it joins some larger way
Where many paths and errands meet.
And whither then? I cannot say. – JRR Tolkien

My father introduced me to both the poet and author I quote here, but he was more fond of one, and I the other. I’ll leave it to the reader to guess or know which is which.

So, I don’t know how many roads I have to travel down, or how many I can. But they’re there, beckoning.